Episode 8: Mary Capps

And… We’re back! Sorry we were off the radar for a while: had to replace the hard drive of our main computer.  But we are back up and running with a brand new episode!

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Mary Capps has been an anti-racist, social justice, lesbian, feminist activist for 50 years or so, mostly in New Orleans.  She has worked with several groups for the Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence.  She also took part in the Autonomous Women’s Movement of New Orleans in the 1970s. She and her current partner Alda Talley are the Godmothers of this project.  When we were first getting started in our Dyke Bar research they shared their stories and their vast network so generously. We Love you, Mary and Alda, and thanks for making all this possible.  This story is about how Mary found queer community.

This Episode was produced by Laine Kaplan-Levenson with music by free feral and Peter Bowling.

Episode 7: The Law One

Episode 7 is here! In this episode: two stories of people navigating the world of Law and Law enforcement.

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First, Mark Gonzalez shares stories about his early years of organizing in the 80’s and early 90’s.   Mark has lived in the Bywater neighborhood for over 25 years and works as an attorney in private practice. His initial involvement in the gay community was as a founding member/organizer of Gay Fest New Orleans where he was an officer for two years. He was also a very active member and organizer with ACTUP, an AIDS advocacy group in New Orleans for many years. Additionally, Mark is one of the organizing/founding members of AIDSLAW of Louisiana. We borrowed some of Mark’s bio from www.lgbtarchiveslouisiana.org; this organization does probably exactly what you think they do. Mark serves in that organization as a board member.

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Mark’s story was produced by Owen Ever, a social historian, performer and theater maker who works at the New Orleans Pharmacy Museum. Visit Vagabondinventions.com and Goatintheroadproductions.org to learn about upcoming projects.   Music for this piece by Ruth Ex, who is part of the band Special Interest.  Ruth’s bandcamp is psychich0tline.bandcamp.com

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Mardi Youngblood was one of our earliest contributors to our Dyke Bar oral history project.  She became an ancestor in 2017, at the age of 71.  In this piece, Mardi details some of her run ins with the law in the 70’s. Her special telling of tall tales and her sense of mischief, humor and caring are greatly missed as her chosen family and friends remember the enthusiasm she had for her many favorite activities: fishing and football.  She left a treasure trove of memories for the women who helped to care for her during the many months of her illness and the many friends she gathered during her life. To many, her legacy serves as a reminder to laugh, love and live the gift of life to its fullest each moment of each day.  We adapted Mardi’s Bio from her obituary which was published on TheNewOrleansAdvocate.com.

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This loving audio tribute was produced by Erin Roussel, an educator and culture bearer from South Louisiana. Erin has been a member of Last Call since 2015 and is so grateful for the beautiful connections this project has brought into her life.

additional music for this episode by free feral.

Episode 6: Stories from the Boston Dyke Bar Scene

Episode 6 is here!  This week we bring you a piece about the Boston Dyke Bar scene in the 60’s through the 90’s.

Photo of Fran’s Place, courtesy of The History Project

Photo of Fran’s Place, courtesy of The History Project

Last Call’s play based on our New Orleans Dyke Bar research, Alleged Lesbian Activies, is coming to Boston, April 4, 5, 6, and 7.  These performances will be done in partnership with The Theatre Offensive, and will feature new material derived from our Boston interviews.  We thought, these interviews are so juicy - let’s do a podcast piece with them!  We have stories of parties, fights, family, pickup and more.  It’s a long one, so cozy in and enjoy

Many thanks to our interviewees Danny Harris, Yani Batteau, Shani Dowd, Sharon Pritchard, Marjorie Posner, Rochelle Ruthchild, Vicki Gabriner, Liz James, Lynn Brown, Pam Chamberlin, Helen Cratin, and Sweet Mykki B.  They were so welcoming and so generous with their time, energy, and stories.  We think you’re going to really enjoy listening to them.

For tickets to see Alleged Lesbian Activities at Jacque’s Cabaret in Boston, click here.  It's a great show in a historic queer venue.  Get your tickets soon - they are going fast!

This week’s episode was produced and scored by free feral.

Special thanks as well to The History Project for this week’s cover image!

Episode 5: Living Out Loud

Episode 5 is here! This week we bring you two stories of people finding their way to living their best life.

Terryl-Lynn Foxx

Terryl-Lynn Foxx

First, we hear from Terryl-Lynn Foxx.  Born under the astrological sign of Leo the Lion, Ms. Foxx  is a native New Orleanian and an entertainer/model/actress who has perfected the art of illusion through 20 years of experience. She  has appeared all over the gay cabaret circuit throughout the United States, as well as appearing on national television, music videos, newspapers and magazines, and the cinema.  This piece details her rise to stardom.

Nathalie Nia Faulk

Nathalie Nia Faulk

This piece was produced by Nathalie Nia (Nate) Faulk in our podcast workshop. Nathalie was born in Lafayette, Louisiana and is a self described Ebony Southern Belle.  Her work consists of Leadership Development, Performance, and Healing and Wellness practices.  Nathalie also works with the Southern Organizer Academy, a leadership development and capacity building pipeline.  They are currently accepting applications. For more information you can go to southernorganizers.org or email them at soa@southernorganizingacademy.org

Our second story this week comes from our friends at WWNO’s Bring Your Own from an event they did in 2016 in partnership with the Unprisoned podcast.

Jewel Williams

Jewel Williams

Jewel Williams told this story in front of a live audience.  At the time she was a sophomore in high school. Now, at 18, she is studying psychology and English at Loyola University. She is proud of her New Orleans upbringing and super proud to be pursuing her degree here. She hopes one day to impact the community in several ways.  This is the story of how Jewel, a New Orleans teen, came out to her parents with a little help from the Bard of Avon.

Episode 2: Mandisa Moore-O'Neal

Episode Two is ready!

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S. Mandisa Moore-O'Neal is a Black feminist and supporter to grassroots black women/black femme-centered organizing.  These days, Mandisa is a civil rights attorney with a focus on family law, HIV De-Criminalization, criminal defense, employment discrimination and police accountability work. Her primary organizing support work is as a Black Youth Project-New Orleans' chapter member and on the Advisory board of Lift Louisiana.   This story takes us back to 2006 when Mandisa was part of a group that founded the Women’s Health and Justice Initiative, an INCITE! affiliate.

This piece was produced by free feral with music by free feral, from an interview by indee mitchell and Nathalie Nia Faulk. Special thanks to Wendi Moore-O’Neal and her brother, Webo O’Neal, for recording a special version of “Freedom is a Constant Struggle.”


Episode 1 : Wendi Moore-O'Neal

Last Call Podcast Season 2 Episode 1 is ready for ya! Get it here.

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This week, we hear a story from Wendi Moore O'Neal. Wendi is a community activist from New Orleans who runs Jaliyah Consulting where she uses "freedom singing, story circles and group facilitation to share civil rights history, culture, and traditions".  She told us about founding [one of] the first LGBT organizations at Spelman College in the 90's.

Recently, Wendi released a documentary "This Little Light" which chronicles her process of seeking justice and making peace when she was unconstitutionally fired for marrying her wife, Mandisa. (who you’ll be hearing from in the next episode) The film was made in collaboration with Ada McMahon and has been featured in festivals all over the country, including the Smithsonian African American Film Festival. Please visit thislittlelightfilm.com to learn more.

This piece was produced by free feral with music by free as well, from an interview by indee mitchell and Nathalie Nia Faulk.  "I Got a Right" is a piece free created as part of a short film of the same title.  The song includes samples of Wendi leading a community in song.   The film was made from public domain footage of the March on Washington, and features words and voices of Audre Lorde and June Jordan.  The piece was created as part of a performance called Power of the Black Feminine by Junebug Productions.  You can see that film here.

Also, Wendi shouts out SONG, Southerners on New Ground.  They still kickin.

NOTE: Some folks reported experiencing sound issues when we first published this piece.  The file has been updated.

Meet the Hosts!

This Season of our podcast is different than the last for a few reasons. This season, we left the bars and are telling stories of Queer Resistance - that’s more identities relating stories that describe a full gamut of revolutionary actions down to the simple minutiae of being one’s self.

This season we also have 2 hosts:

You may remember free feral from last season; they produced edited and eventually hosted some episodes in the first season. They are also a musician. Now they’re back and excited to share a whole new batch of queer stories with you.

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But we also have a new team member on board. Meet Laine Kaplan-Levenson! Laine produced WWNO’s Tripod and Sticky Wicket. They joined us this season as a workshop leader, producer and host. We are super excited to have them on board!

Listen to the trailer here, subscribe, and look for the first episode in your feed this Thursday, February 14.